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18Nov
2014

Information Retrieval Pathways for Health Information Exchange in Multiple Care Settings

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Abstract:

Objectives: To determine which health information exchange (HIE) technologies and information retrieval pathways healthcare professionals relied on to meet their information needs in the context of laboratory test results, radiological images and reports, and medication histories.

Study Design: Primary data was collected over a 2-month period across 3 emergency departments, 7 primary care practices, and 2 public health clinics in New York state.

Methods: Qualitative research methods were used to collect and analyze data from semi-structured interviews and participant observation.

Results: The study reveals that healthcare professionals used a complex combination of information retrieval pathways for HIE to obtain clinical information from external organizations. The choice for each approach was setting- and information-specific, but was also highly dynamic across users and their information needs.

Conclusions: Our findings about the complex nature of information sharing in healthcare provide insights for informatics professionals about the usage of information; indicate the need for managerial support within each organization; and suggest approaches to improve systems for organizations and agencies working to expand HIE adoption.

You can read the entire article by clicking this link.

15Oct
2014

How could health information exchange better meet the needs of care practitioners?

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Abstract:

Background: Health information exchange (HIE) has the potential to improve the quality of healthcare by enabling providers with better access to patient information from multiple sources at the point of care. However, HIE efforts have historically been difficult to establish in the US and the failure rates of organizations created to foster HIE have been high. Objectives: We sought to better understand how RHIO-based HIE systems were used in practice and the challenges care practitioners face using them. The objective of our study were to so investigate how HIE can better meet the needs of care practitioners.

Methods: We performed a multiple-case study using qualitative methods in three communities in New York State. We conducted interviews onsite and by telephone with HIE users and non-users and observed the workflows of healthcare professionals at multiple healthcare organizations participating in a local HIE effort in New York State.

Results: The empirical data analysis suggests that challenges still remain in increasing provider usage, optimizing HIE implementations and connecting HIE systems across geographic regions. Important determinants of system usage and perceived value includes users experienced level of available information and the fit of use for physician workflows.

Conclusions: Challenges still remain in increasing provider adoption, optimizing HIE implementations, and demonstrating value. The inability to find information reduced usage of HIE. Healthcare organizations, HIE facilitating organizations, and states can help support HIE adoption by ensuring patient information is accessible to providers through increasing patient consents, fostering broader participation, and by ensuring systems are usable.

You can read the entire article by clicking this link.

01NOV
2013

eHealth in Denmark: A Case Study

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Abstract: Denmark is widely regarded as a leading country in terms of eHealth integration and healthcare delivery services. The push for eHealth adoption over that past 20 years in the Danish health sector has led to the deployment of multiple eHealth technologies. However, in reality the Danish healthcare suffers from eHealth system fragmentation which has led to eHealth's inability to reach full potential in delivering quality healthcare service. This paper will presents a case study of the current state of eHealth in the Danish healthcare system and discuss the current challenges the country is facing today.

You can read the entire article by clicking this link.

20DEC
2012

E-Prescription across Europe

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Abstract: The use of electronic prescription has been designated as an important strategic policy to improve health care in Europe. The aim of the European Union is to have a cross-border electronic healthcare system in Europe which will enable EU citizens to obtain e-Prescriptions anywhere in Europe. Cross border e-Prescription presents a myriad of challenges. This paper examines the issues concerning the EU eHealth interoperability policy, specifically with regards to the cross-border use of e-Prescription. The research involved conducting a review of the most current literature and government reports regarding e-Prescription implementation on a national level in several European countries. The European Union is pushing for more cross border health data exchange. Despite favourable attitudes towards cross border e-Prescriptions, multiple perceived barriers impede its incorporation in clinical practice. There are varying interpretations and implementations of data protection and confidentiality laws in the 27 member states. Infrastructures are not in place to support the system and stakeholders in some jurisdictions are reluctant to embrace e-health due to the high cost and the lack of security of the systems. The study concludes that member states have varying degrees of health care policy, privacy enforcement and laws concerning data protection, telecommunication services and digital signature with regards to e-Prescription. Interoperability of different systems is only a partial solution. Security and enforcement of privacy must also be equally enforced.

You can read the entire article by clicking this link.

26MAR
2012

Medical Data Breach

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Abstract: The EU and the United States have implemented data breach notification rules that cover the health sectors. Nevertheless, data breach incidents involving medical data continue to rise, especially in the US and the UK. The HITECH Act, Pub. L. 111-5 Title XIII is the first federal health breach notification law in the US to be characterized by less government intrusions, while the revised EU Privacy Directive, 2009/136/EC calls for tougher privacy protection for data held by electronic communication providers. While the EU law sets a global de facto standard, the law remains toothless without strong enforcement mechanisms.

You can read the entire article by clicking this link.

13Oct
2011

2011 IAITL Conference

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I recently attented the 2011 IAITL Conference held in Nicosia, Cyprus, to discuss my recently published CLSR paper on the newly enacted Directive 2011/24/EU on Patients' Rights in cross border healthcare due for implementation by 2013. You can read more about it by clicking this link.

11JuNE
2011

IS-EUD 2011 Conference

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I presented two papers at the Third International Symposium on End-User Development, IS-EUD 2011, held in Torre Canne, Italy, in June 2011. Only 22 papers were carefully selected for presentation, including my article dealing with the legal implications of End-User Development.

 

23NOV 2010

Invited Speaker: Center for Strategic Analysis

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Jeux vidéo : quelle régulation des contenus et des pratiques?

A public workshop was held in Paris on November 23rd where experts in video games from various fields (sociology, political science, psychology, psychiatry, representatives of associations and actors of the videogame industry) were invited to share their experiences and discuss the social, sanitary and public policy implications of gaming.

The workshop was hosted by the Center for Strategic Analysis, is a think tank working directly under the direction of the Prime Minister of France and the Minister for Economic Forecasting and the Development of Digital Economy.

The audience of the workshop was constituted of executives from the public service and the private sector, journalists and people working for the French Government.

You can view the proceedings of the workshop here via the following link.

http://www.strategie.gouv.fr/article.php3?id_article=1275